Will the PS4’s God of War Break in Tradition Extend Beyond Its New Release Date?

PS4-exclusive God of War finally has a release date. Available from April 20, Sony has announced special editions for the game including the God of War Stone Mason Edition. Previously it was suggested to release in March, much like past entries in the franchise. On this episode of Transition, we discuss God of War’s popularity in India and the country would get anything more than the standard edition of the game as well as if its new gameplay elements could alienate long-time fans.

Besides Sony, Microsoft revealed that first-party exclusives like Sea of Thieves and that new entries in Halo and Gears of War franchises would be available on Xbox Game Pass from day one. This appears to be another way for the company to push games as a service, but does it actually add value to its library of exclusives? We ponder on the ramifications of this move that seems to exist to push digital downloads over games on disc.

And in more Microsoft news, the company finally revealed the Xbox One X for India. Unlike its past efforts, it promises to bring wider distribution to the table (the Xbox One was exclusive to Amazon for the longest time) and stronger third-party support. Microsoft India claims that this is a result of it listening to its fans, something its international operations headed by Phil Spencer has done in the past to some success. Though it’s too early to tell if it would have the same impact in India, it’s a heartening move. We wonder if translate to availability of accessories, Xbox One trade-ins, and limited edition games coming to the market.

This isn’t all. Two big releases cap off the week with Monster Hunter World and Dragon Ball Fighterz. We’ve been fortunate to play both and explain why they’re worth bothering with for the discerning gamer.

You can subscribe to Transition via Apple Podcasts or RSS or just listen to this episode by hitting the play button below. The music for this episode comes via Magnus Souleye Pålsson’s album PPPPPP, which is the soundtrack for the game, VVVVVV.