The 100 Best Movies on Netflix in India

Since its arrival at the start of 2016, Netflix has built up a sizeable kitty of content across borders and genres in India. But the streaming service doesn’t always do a great job of surfacing the best of what it has to offer, instead personalising what you see around what you’ve already seen on Netflix. That means you’ll never see some great movies unless you go looking for them. To make things easier for you, we used aggregate ratings on Rotten Tomatoes and IMDb to draw up a shortlist, and then picked our top 100.

Here are our top 100 movies on Netflix that are available in India, sorted alphabetically. This list will be updated once every month if there are any worthy additions or if some movies are removed from the service, so bookmark this page and keep checking in.

  • 12 Years A Slave (2013)
    Duped into slavery on the account of a job, Steve McQueen’s adaptation of a free New York black man’s (Chiwetel Ejiofor) 19th-century memoir is an incredible true story, and an important watch.

  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
    In Stanley Kubrick’s highly-influential sci-fi film, humanity charts a course for Jupiter with the sentient computer HAL 9000, to understand the discovery of a black monolith affecting human evolution. It’s less plot, and more a visual and aural experience.

  • A Beautiful Mind (2001)
    The life of John Nash, a brilliant but asocial mathematician, from his spiral into paranoid schizophrenia and working on a secret project he made up, to regaining control over his life and becoming a Nobel Laureate.

  • A Clockwork Orange (1971)
    Set in a near-future dystopian Britain, writer-director Stanley Kubrick adapts Anthony Burgess’ novel of the same name, commenting on juvenile delinquency through the eyes of a small gang leader who enjoys «a bit of the old ultra-violence».

  • Aladdin (1992)
    Disney puts its animation flavour onto the famous folk tale of a street urchin who disguises himself as a wealthy prince after finding a genie in a magic lamp, in an attempt to impress the Sultan’s daughter.

  • American Beauty (1999)
    A depressed advertising executive (Kevin Spacey) in the midst of a midlife crisis falls for his teenage daughter’s best friend, in Sam Mendes’ satire of American middle-class that ultimately won five Oscars including Best Picture.

  • American Graffiti (1973)
    Before Star Wars, George Lucas made this influential high school comedy about life in the early 60s, filled with the era’s most memorable rock ‘n’ roll hits, and starring Harrison Ford, Ron Howard, and Richard Dreyfuss.

  • Animal House (1978)
    In this landmark comedy from John Landis, a misfit group of fraternity members challenge the dean’s authority to keep their charter, filled with manic energy, and launching the gross out genre.

  • Apollo 13 (1995)
    Ron Howard dramatises the aborted Apollo 13 mission that put the astronauts in jeopardy after an on-board explosion ate up all the oxygen and forced NASA to abort and get the men home safely.

  • Argo (2012)
    Ben Affleck directs and stars in this film about a CIA agent posing as a Hollywood producer scouting for location in Iran, in order to rescue six Americans during the US hostage crisis of 1979.

  • Beasts of No Nation (2015)
    With civil war raging across a fictional African nation, this Netflix Original focuses on a young boy who’s trained as a child soldier by a fierce warlord (Idris Elba), and the effects it has on him.

  • Big Hero 6 (2014)
    A plus-sized inflatable robot becomes friends with a robotics prodigy, who team up with a group of friends in this Disney animated adventure loosely based on the Marvel comics, forming a high-tech hero team.

  • Black Friday (2004)
    So controversial that it had wait three years to see the light of day, Anurag Kashyap’s gripping docudrama looks at the aftermath of the 1993 Bombay bombings, through the eyes of police, conspirators, victims and middlemen.

  • Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)
    Audrey Hepburn lights up the screen as a young, broke socialite who takes a fancy to a young, struggling writer after he moves into her apartment building, as she tries to keep her ugly past buried.

  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014)
    Living a quiet life in the US capital and now working for the government, Captain America (Chris Evans) makes a series of troubling discoveries and comes up against a formidable foe with a familiar face. Watch The Avengers before hitting play on this one.

  • Catch Me If You Can (2002)
    Based on a real-life story, a young con man (Leonardo DiCaprio) forges cheques worth millions of dollars, and escapes the clutches of a seasoned FBI agent (Tom Hanks) for years.

  • Court (2014)
    Winner of the top prize at the National Film Awards, this legal drama made with non-professional actors delivers a scathing critique of the judicial nightmare in India through the lens of an ageing singer accused of abetting a manhole worker’s suicide through his songs.

  • Dangal (2016)
    The extraordinary true story of amateur wrestler Mahavir Singh Phogat (Aamir Khan) who trains his two daughters to become India’s first world-class female wrestlers, who went on to win gold medals at the Commonwealth Games.

  • Das Boot (1981)
    One of the most authentic war movies ever made chronicles the life of a German submarine crew during World War II, as they go through long stretches of boredom and periods of intense conflict, while trying to maintain morale in a capsule 10 feet by 150 feet hundreds of metres under the surface.

  • District 9 (2009)
    Inspired by the Apartheid, Neill Blomkamp’s feature debut explores the life of extra-terrestrial beings forced to live in slum-like conditions outside Johannesburg, through the eyes of a government agent responsible for their relocation.

  • Django Unchained (2012)
    Written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, a German bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) helps a freed slave (Jamie Foxx) rescue his wife from a charming but cruel plantation owner (Leonardo DiCaprio).

  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
    Possibly the greatest anti-war film, Stanley Kubrick delivers a masterful satire of the Cold War fears of nuclear conflict, through the eyes of an unhinged American general who orders a strike against Russia without informing his superiors, and how the country’s top politicians try to stop it.

  • Drive (2011)
    A stuntman moonlighting as a getaway driver (Ryan Gosling) grows fond of his neighbour and her young son, and then takes part in a botched heist to protect them from the debt-ridden husband.

  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)
    An estranged couple (Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet) begin a new relationship unaware they dated previously, having erased each other from their memories, in what stands as writer Charlie Kaufman’s defining work.

  • Forrest Gump (1994)
    A slow-witted but kind-hearted man (Tom Hanks) takes part in a series of defining events of the second half of the 20th century in the US, while pining for his childhood love.

  • Frozen (2013)
    With help from an iceman, his reindeer, and a talking snowman, a fearless princess (Kristen Bell) sets out to find her queen sister (Idina Menzel) who has mistakenly frozen the entire kingdom. It’s the highest-grossing animated film of all-time.

  • Full Metal Jacket (1987)
    Stanley Kubrick follows a US marine nicknamed Joker from his days as a new recruit under the command of a ruthless sergeant, to his posting as a war correspondent in South Vietnam, while observing the effects of the war on his fellow soldiers.

  • Ghostbusters (1984)
    A bunch of eccentric paranormal enthusiasts start a ghost-catching business in New York, and then stumble upon a plot to wreak havoc by summoning ghosts, giving birth to one of the most iconic song lyrics in history.

  • Gravity (2013)
    Two US astronauts, a first-timer (Sandra Bullock) and another on his final mission (George Clooney), are stranded in space after their shuttle is destroyed, and then must battle debris and challenging conditions to return home.

  • Groundhog Day (1993)
    A TV weatherman (Bill Murray) on a routine Groundhog Day assignment finds himself caught in a time loop, living the same day over and over, and must figure out how to get himself out of the predicament.

  • Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)
    A bunch of intergalactic misfits, which includes a talking racoon and tree, come together to form a ragtag team in this Marvel adventure that needs no prior knowledge.

  • Hell or High Water (2016)
    A divorced father (Chris Pine) teams up with his ex-con brother to carry out an elaborate bank-robbing scheme to safeguard a family ranch and his children’s future, while being chased by the police (Jeff Bridges).

  • Her (2013)
    A lonely man (Joaquin Phoenix) falls in love with an intelligent computer operating system (Scarlett Johansson), who enriches his life and learns from him, in Spike Jonze’s masterpiece.

  • Hot Fuzz (2007)
    An over-achieving London police officer (Simon Pegg) is transferred to an idyllic village, and slowly stumbles upon a local conspiracy that’s helping keep up its crime-free image. Edgar Wright co-wrote with Pegg, and directed.

  • How to Train Your Dragon (2010)
    Brought up in a world where Vikings have a tradition of being dragon slayers, a young teenager becomes an unlikely friend with a young dragon, and learns there may be more to the creatures than everyone thinks.

  • I, Daniel Blake (2016)
    After a heart attack that leaves him unable to work, a widowed carpenter is forced to fight an obtuse British welfare system, while developing a strong bond with a single mother who has two children. Winner of the Palme d’Or.

  • Inception (2010)
    From the mind of Christopher Nolan, Leonardo DiCaprio stars as a thief who has the power to enter other’s dreams and steal their ideas, and is then given the mission of his life if he wants to be reunited with his family.

  • Inside Out (2015)
    Set for the most part inside a young girl’s head, her five core emotions now personified – Fear, Anger, Joy, Disgust, and Sadness – struggle to help her cope with her new life after moving to a big city, in this Oscar-winning animation from Pixar.

  • Juno (2007)
    When a sixteen-year-old social misfit (Ellen Page) ends up with an unplanned pregnancy in this sharp-edged coming-of-age comedy, she must decide what she wants.

  • Kung Fu Panda (2008)
    After an obese kung fu enthusiast panda is supposedly mistakenly chosen as the Dragon Warrior to fight an impending threat, he is unwillingly taught by an elderly master and his students who have been training for years.

  • Lagaan (2001)
    Set in Victorian India, a village farmer (Aamir Khan) stakes everyone’s future on a game of cricket with the well-equipped British, in exchange for a tax reprieve for three years.

  • Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
    In what is generally considered one of the greatest films, an English officer (Peter O’Toole) successfully unites and leads the diverse warring Arab tribes against the Turks during World War I.

  • Mad Max: Fury Road (2015)
    Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron star in director George Miller’s reboot of his own franchise, which finds a woman (Theron) rebelling against a tyrannical ruler of postapocalyptic desert, and giving us some of the best action sequences in the process.

  • Masaan (2015)
    Neeraj Ghaywan ventures into the heartland of India to explore the life of four people in his directorial debut, all of whom must battle issues of caste, culture and norms. Winner of a National Award and the FIPRESCI Prize at Cannes.

  • Moneyball (2011)
    Based on the true story of Oakland Athletics and manager Billy Beane (Brad Pitt), it follows the latter’s attempts to build a competitive team by relying solely on statistical analysis, with help from a Yale graduate (Jonah Hill).

  • Monsters, Inc. (2001)
    Two monsters get the fright of their lives after a human child wanders into their world, and must figure out how to get her back without telling anyone, so as to keep their jobs.

  • Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975)
    The legendary British comedy troupe mix their talents with the tale of King Arthur and his knights, as they look for the Holy Grail and encounter a series of horrors. A contender for the best comedy of all-time.

  • Monty Python’s Life of Brian (1979)
    Satire so cutting that it was banned for years in the UK and elsewhere, Life of Brian saw Monty Python turning their eyes on more long-form storytelling. The Life of Brian is the story of a young Jewish man born on the same day and next door to Jesus Christ, who gets mistaken for the messiah.

  • Moonrise Kingdom (2012)
    Wes Anderson brings his signature touch to a coming-of-age tale of two young lovers (they’re 12) who run away from their homes, prompting the entire town to look for them.

  • Mudbound (2017)
    A Netflix Original, this World War II drama is set in rural Mississippi, and follows two veterans – one white and one black – who return home, and must deal with problems of racism in addition to PTSD.

  • Mughal-e-Azam (1960)
    A 16th-century Mughal prince clashes with his father, Emperor Akbar, after he falls in love with a court dancer in this epic drama, which stands as a milestone in Indian cinema and is called by some as the best Hindi film ever made.

  • Nebraska (2013)
    Intentionally shot in black-and-white, Alexander Payne’s road comedy sees an estranged son reluctantly agree to drive his elderly alcoholic father so he can claim a million-dollar sweepstakes prize, and gets to know him on their journey.

  • No Country for Old Men (2007)
    In this Coen brothers’ neo-Western that’s often called their best work, Javier Bardem and Josh Brolin engage in a cat and mouse thriller across eighties Texas, for two million dollars that cause a lot of bloodshed.

  • Okja (2017)
    Part environment parable and part skewer of corporatisation, this underappreciated Netflix Original by Bong Joon-ho tells its story of a young Korean girl and her best friend – a giant pet pig – while effortlessly crossing genres.

  • Oldboy (2003)
    In Park Chan-wook’s bloody action film, a businessman imprisoned for 15 years in a hotel room finally escapes and begins his quest for vengeance, while finding himself trapped in a complex web of his former captor’s making and falling for a young female sushi chef.

  • Piku (2015)
    On a road trip from Delhi to Kolkata, a strong-willed daughter (Deepika Padukone) and her ageing, hypochondriac father (Amitabh Bachchan) endure an emotional roller coaster in this offbeat comedy from Shoojit Sircar.

  • Prisoners (2013)
    After his daughter and her friend are kidnapped, a father (Hugh Jackman) takes matters into his own hands while the police methodically track down multiple leads, getting himself into trouble.

  • Reservoir Dogs (1992)
    After a simply jewellery heist goes wrong in Quentin Tarantino’s feature-length debut, six criminals – Tim Roth, Steve Buscemi, and Michael Madsen are a few of the actors – who don’t know each other’s identity start to suspect each other of being a police informant.

  • Saving Private Ryan (1998)
    In Steven Spielberg’s World War II drama, while war rages on in Normandy, an army captain (Tom Hanks) is given the task of searching for a particular private (Matt Damon), whose three brothers have already been killed.

  • Scarface (1983)
    Al Pacino delivers one of his best performances as a Cuban refugee who arrives in 1980s Miami with nothing, rises the ranks to become a powerful drug kingpin, and then falls due to his ego, his paranoia, and a growing list of enemies.

  • Scent of A Woman (1992)
    A prep school student in need of money agrees to «babysit» an irritable and blind retired Army vet (Al Pacino), but the job turns out to be nothing like he imagined.

  • Schindler’s List (1993)
    After witnessing the persecution of his Jewish employees in German-occupied Poland during World War II, a German industrialist and member of the Nazi party (Liam Neeson) saves them from being sent to concentration camps by spending everything he has in Steven Spielberg’s adaptation of an Australian novel.

  • Se7en (1995)
    In this dark, gripping thriller from David Fincher, two detectives – one new (Brad Pitt) and one about to retire (Morgan Freeman) – hunt a serial killer (Kevin Spacey) who uses the seven deadly sins as his motives.

  • Sense and Sensibility (1995)
    Jane Austen’s famous work is brought to life by director Ang Lee, about three sisters who are forced to seek financial security through marriage after the death of their wealthy father leaves them poor by the rules of inheritance.

  • Shrek (2001)
    A half-parody of fairy tales, Shrek is about an eponymous ogre who agrees to help an evil lord get a queen in exchange for the deed to his swamp, filled with enough jokes for the adults and a simple plot children.

  • Silver Linings Playbook (2012)
    Two people (Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper) with pain and suffering in their past begin a road to recovery while training together for a dance competition, in what becomes an unlikely love story.

  • Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)
    Forced into exile by her evil stepmother, a princess is rescued by seven dwarf miners in one of Disney’s most popular and oldest animated films.

  • Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015)
    Derivative yet fun, J.J. Abrams kicked off the new Star Wars trilogy with new characters more diverse than before while keeping the old guard around, as they join hands to stop the rise of a new world order.

  • Straight Outta Compton (2015)
    The rise and fall of gangsta rap outfit N.W.A., from the streets of a small California town to revolutionising the hip hop culture with their words, that crosses boundaries and stands as a terrific underdog story.

  • Swades (2004)
    Shah Rukh Khan stars a successful NASA scientist in this based on a true story drama, who returns home to India to take his nanny to the US, rediscovers his roots and connects with the local village community in the process.

  • Taare Zameen Par (2007)
    Sent to boarding school against his will, a dyslexic eight-year-old is helped by an unconventional art teacher (Aamir Khan) to overcome his disability and discover his true potential.

  • Tangled (2010)
    Locked up by her overly protective mother, a young long-haired girl finally gets her wish to escape into the world outside thanks to a good-hearted thief, and discovers her true self.

  • Taxi Driver (1976)
    A mentally unstable Vietnam War vet (Robert de Niro) takes a job as a taxi driver, and turns to violent action after seeing the sleaze, dysfunction and prostitution in New York. Martin Scorsese directs.

  • The Aviator (2004)
    With Leonardo DiCaprio as Howard Hughes and Cate Blanchett as Katharine Hepburn, Martin Scorsese dives into the life of the aviation pioneer and film producer, who grapples with severe OCD while his fame grows.

  • The Bourne Ultimatum (2007)
    Matt Damon reprises his role as amnesiac CIA assassin Jason Bourne in this third and best entry of the series, as he sets out to track down the man who trained him while learning more about the life he doesn’t remember.

  • The Dark Knight (2008)
    In the second part of Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy, regarded as the greatest comic book movie ever, Batman (Christian Bale) faces a villain, the Joker (Heath Ledger), he doesn’t understand, and must go through hell to save Gotham and its people.

  • The Godfather (1972)
    In what is considered one of the greatest films of all-time, an aging leader (Marlon Brando) of a New York mafia transfers control of his empire to his youngest son (Al Pacino), who goes from a reluctant outsider to a ruthless boss.

  • The Hunger Games: Catching Fire (2013)
    In the best of four movies, Jennifer Lawrence’s Katniss Everdeen is forced to participate in a special edition of the Hunger Games, a competition where individuals fight to the death, featuring the winners of all previous competitions.

  • The Jungle Book (2016)
    Rudyard Kipling’s classic tale of a human boy brought up in the jungle is given a terrific CGI rendition by Disney, with a voice cast involving Idris Elba, Bill Murray, Ben Kingsley, Lupita Nyong’o, and Scarlett Johansson.

  • The Last of the Mohicans (1992)
    Set amidst the mid-18th-century Indo-French War, Michael Mann readapts the 1826 novel of the same name while relying more on the 1936 adaptation, about an adopted son (Daniel-Day Lewis) of a Mohican scout who falls for a British officer’s daughter.

  • The Lion King (1994)
    Tricked into thinking he caused his father’s death, a lion cub runs away from home and grows up with a pair of carefree wastrels, only to be reminded of his rightful place later in life and why he must return.

  • The Little Mermaid (1989)
    Hans Christian Andersen’s 19th-century tale about a young mermaid Ariel who makes a bargain with the sea witch Ursula and gives up her life in the sea to meet a human prince got the Disney animation treatment, which signalled the studio’s return.

  • The Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001-2003)
    Peter Jackson brought J.R.R. Tolkien’s expansive Middle-Earth to life in these three three-hour epics, which charts the journey of a meek hobbit (Elijah Wood) and his various companions, as they try to stop the Dark Lord Sauron by destroying the source of his power, the One Ring.

  • The Matrix (1999)
    A computer hacker (Keanu Reeves) starts to question the nature of his reality in the Wachowskis’ seminal work, and with help from a group of rebels, he begins the fight against the machines that now rule the world.

  • The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993)
    In this stop-motion musical conceived by Tim Burton, a resident from Halloween Town stumbles into Christmas Town, becomes enchanted and abducts Santa Claus to bring him home that causes problems for everyone.

  • The Perks of Being A Wallflower (2012)
    Emma Watson stars in this coming-of-age comedy based on the novel of the same name by Stephen Chbosky, who also wrote and directed the film. Watson plays one of two seniors who guide a nervous freshman.

  • The Raid (2011)
    This Indonesian martial arts actioner balks at Hollywood’s over-reliance on guns and explosions to wow audiences, using long stretches of incredible fight choreography to bolster its simple video game-ish plot: an elite cop squad sent to clear a high-rise building owned by a drug lord, floor by floor.

  • The Shining (1980)
    Stephen King’s popular novel gets the film treatment from Stanley Kubrick, about a father who loses his sanity in an isolated hotel the family is staying at for the winter, while his psychic son sees horrific forebodings from the past and the future.

  • The Social Network (2010)
    The tale of Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg gets a slight fictional spin, as it explores how the young engineer was sued by twin brothers who claimed he stole their idea, and sold lies to his co-founder and squeezed him out.

  • The Usual Suspects (1995)
    A small-time con man (Kevin Spacey) lays out an elaborate story during a police investigation of how he got mixed up in a massacre, telling them about the legend of a crime lord known as Keyser Söze.

  • To Kill A Mockingbird (1962)
    Based on Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, a lawyer (Gregory Peck) defends a black man accused of raping a white woman, while protecting his children from the racism and evil that persists in their small town.

  • Train to Busan (2016)
    Stuck on a blood-drenched bullet train ride across Korea, a father and his daughter must fight their way through a countrywide zombie outbreak to make it to the only city that’s safe.

  • Trainspotting (1996)
    A former drug addict is pulled back into the world by his friends in director Danny Boyle’s breakout film, which explored the problems of those living in urban poverty in Edinburgh.

  • Vertigo (1958)
    Topping Citizen Kane in the latest Sight & Sound poll, Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller about a detective afraid of heights who falls for an old friend’s wife while investigating her strange activities continued his tradition of turning audiences into voyeurs.

  • Warrior (2011)
    A young vet (Tom Hardy) returns home and begins mixed martial arts training under his former boxer father, with the winner-takes-all fight pitting him against his estranged, older brother (Joel Edgerton).

  • Whiplash (2014)
    An ambitious young drummer (Miles Teller) is pushed to his limits and beyond by an abusive instructor (J.K. Simmons) in what became writer-director Damien Chazelle’s breakthrough.

  • Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988)
    Set in Hollywood during the late 1940s, this combination of live-action and animation follows a private detective hired by a cartoon character, who is accused of murdering a wealthy businessman.

  • Wreck-It Ralph (2012)
    This Disney animated film tells the story of a video game villain who sets out to fulfil his dream of becoming a hero, but ends up bringing havoc to the entire arcade where he lives.

  • Zombieland (2009)
    A student looking for his parents (Jesse Eisenberg), a man looking for a favourite snack, and two con artist sisters join forces and take an extended road trip across a zombie-filled America, while they all search for a zombie-free sanctuary.

  • Zootopia (2016)
    An anthropomorphic bunny (Ginnifer Goodwin) and fox (Jason Bateman) unwillingly team up in this animated detective story, to investigate the mystery of the missing predators, one that links to a high-level conspiracy.

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